Celiac Disease and Diabetes-What is the Secret Link & Solution?

Celiac Disease and Diabetes-What is the Secret Link & Solution?

Celiac Disease and Diabetes

There is a genetic connection between type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, therefore, if you are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, your risk for getting celiac disease increases in many folds.  It is highly linked to celiac disease on a genetic level, and a good number of people living with type 1 diabetes are sufferers of the disease. Celiac disease is diagnosed later in life, unlike type 2 diabetes which has no connection between type 2 diabetes and celiac disease.

Celiac Disease Gluten Free

Celiac disease affects people with type 1 diabetes and it is also a disorder in which the small intestine cannot absorb enough of certain nutrients and water. The symptoms vary widely, but are often absent in individuals with type 1 diabetes that can cause unstable blood sugar control. You want to be extremely cautious about this.

Celiac disease can lead to recurrent inexplicable low or high blood glucose readings.  And once treatment has begun and nutrients are better absorbed, insulin doses may need to be adjusted. During the time before diagnosis, insulin needs are frequently lower. So be sure to make note of this.

It is caused by eating foods that contain gluten, a type of protein found in rye. Wheat, barley, bran, bulgur, Kamut, Orzo, semolina, spelled and small amounts are found in rice, sorghum, corn, and oats. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease which requires treatment of a firm gluten free diet. With celiac disease gluten is the enemy!

Celiac disease is a lifetime ailment where your immune system reacts to gluten. But if you have type 2 diabetes you are not at increased risk of celiac disease as type 2 diabetes is not an autoimmune condition. That’s the good news if you are type 2 and not type 1.

Celiac disease is about three times more common in the general population than type 1 diabetes, but if you are doing a great job following the gluten-free diet, your intestine will improve by healing and this will result in better absorption. The end result is going to affect your blood sugar and this increases your require of insulin.

If you are having unsolved episodes of low blood sugar, undiagnosed celiac disease is a significant cause. Essentially, you could be tired all the time due to celiac disease and not even know it. And I’m sure that you are aware that low blood sugar is extremely dangerous!

Pregnant Woman
Pregnant Woman

Sometimes the celiac disease is triggered or becomes more active after childbirth, surgery, during pregnancy, viral infection or severe emotional stress. When the body’s immune system overreacts to gluten in food, the reaction damages the tiny, hair-like projections also known as villi that line the small intestine. This is where the problem begins.

Only those that need gluten are people with celiac disease and if you don’t have celiac disease, then you don’t need to follow a gluten-free diet. They are not in any way great health benefits compared with other diets designed for people with diabetes. Therefore if you have diabetes and celiac disease, you should go gluten-free. This is a given. You absolutely must avoid gluten!

Consumption of high-carb foods can raise your blood sugar, so be careful and how you consume them. Because many high-carbohydrate foods are often grain-based, gluten is found in many of them. Since high-carb foods can raise your blood sugar, then portion control is very essential. A person with celiac disease only need a very small amount of gluten to get better and sometimes a gluten bigotry to have a reaction.

Latent Celiac Disease Symptoms

Latent celiac disease diagnoses are made when blood tests are positive for the condition, but a visual examination of your intestines reveals no damage to the villi that line the organ. This onset of celiac disease must have occurred to the person during childhood, but successfully treated it with a gluten-free diet. So it is essential to be on a gluten-free diet.

Gluten Free Diet

The clinical picture of celiac disease has improved over recent over the years and symptoms are now recognized as being extremely diverse. Classic or typical symptoms of celiac disease include altered bowel habits, fatigue, abdominal pain and bloating, weight loss, growth failure, and nausea. You want to do your best to control celiac disease by avoiding gluten, but you must control your diabetes with insulin at the same time.

Even though latent celiac symptoms can be any symptoms of celiac disease, there are a few symptoms that are more likely to be latent than others. Most at times, a latent symptom of any kind is one that does not consistently present itself. Because it doesn’t persist, people may mistakenly tag it as a sign of a specific illness. Be on the lookout for the celiac symptoms.

Silent Celiac Disease Symptoms

Silent celiac symptoms have similar features as that of latent symptoms of celiac in that they are present but often either overlooked or misdiagnosed. Unlike gastrointestinal symptoms, as mentioned at the beginning are pretty evident, silent symptoms often blend into your life and are excused for occurring as a result of some other activity in your life.

You might not link these celiac signs with a serious condition like celiac sprue disease. Celiac sprue disease comes with symptoms that are silent that you could experience as: include nausea, possible weight loss, being irritable and fatigued, having sore muscles, and even headaches too.

Celiac Sprue

Celiac Sprue is also a form of the celiac disease; it is a genetic disorder that primarily affects the digestive system. The intolerance for gluten leads to intestinal damage due to inflammation. Celiac sprue can be diminished when a patient follows a strict diet so that gastric cancers and pernicious anemia can be avoided.

Celiac sprue disease is a serious autoimmune disease and if you suspect you may be suffering from it, you are advised to consult your doctor right away. Don’t wait and think it’s going away by itself. It’s not.

With celiac sprue disease, you might have experienced some of the gastrointestinal symptoms. The most common of these symptoms are: constipation, pain in the intestines, and diarrhea that comes and goes. Nobody is comfortable suffering through these symptoms.

Symptoms of Celiac Disease Include:

Woman With Migraine Headache
Woman With Migraine Headache

They include:

  • Bloating
  • Abdominal pain
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Anemia
  • Osteopenia (low bone density)
  • Fatty liver
  • Reoccurring skin rash
  • Recurrent miscarriages
  • Unexplained hypoglycemia (often true for people with diabetes)
  • Dizziness
  • Neurological disorders
  • Emotional issues

You may only have one of the above symptoms and sometimes you may notice none of the digestive complaints. If celiac disease is left untreated, it can cause serious damage to your bowels, brain, skin, liver, bones, and central nervous system. Be observant and persistent with these symptoms.

Misdiagnosed Celiac Symptoms

Misdiagnosed celiac symptoms are symptoms which may be hard to diagnose as other ailments. It includes irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease and lactose intolerance. If, in any way you have been diagnosed with one of these conditions, it simply means that you might possibility experienced CD symptoms. Don’t procrastinate. Take action promptly!

Celiac sprue disease is a serious autoimmune disease and if you suspect you may be suffering from it, I urge you to consult your doctor right away. A strict gluten-free diet may be your key to greater health and vitality

Celiac Disease in Children

These symptoms in children are made visible within three to five months after the first intake. A child suffering from celiac will flourish until gluten is introduced into the diet, thereafter, the child will refuse to be fed and would start losing weight. A child with celiac disease will exhibit symptoms like irritability and would develop a large abdomen. Stools would become abnormal and will be loose like diarrhea.

Symptoms

Inability to concentrate on children, difficulty with mental alertness, it could also include mood swings and depression that could also be experienced by teens. In any event take notice of changes in your children.

Products like barley, rye, and oats should be avoided. While fruits, grilled meats, vegetables, salads, eggs, and potatoes can be stapled choices for a person who is suffering from celiac.

Treatment

Follow a gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease, yet it is pertinent to understand that what is food to one is poison to another. Hence, celiac disease treatment simply means following a diet that avoids food products that contain gluten. Therefore, it is not recommendable to use ordinary bread, cakes, pasta, and many convenience foods. It is important to note that celiac food consists of much of what everyone else eats.

Foods That Are Good To Eat on Celiac Disease

Food options on a celiac disease diet are not quite limited. Many natural foods are gluten-free. Also, many of the foods that are considered to be celiac food have been enjoyed by celiac victims prior to diagnosis of the disease. There are many foods that are gluten-free these days.

Celiac Food includes:

Fresh Vegetables
Fresh Vegetables

Fresh milk, chicken, fish, eggs, cheese, fish, cream, meat, butter, all fresh fruit, vegetables, salads, potatoes, maize, nuts and seeds, jam, rice, honey, some brands of chocolate, some brands of sugar, ice cream, sunflower oil and olive oil, It is important to note the emphasis on the word ‘’fresh’’. But you certainly don’t want sugar if you have diabetes.

Foods to avoid on a celiac disease diet   

Processed food meals that are pre-prepared include: French fries that are frozen, cereal, certain snacks and condiments including mayonnaise, mustard and soy sauce which often do contain gluten. These are to mention but a few, it is just to give you an idea. The celiac suffers needs to learn how to carefully read the labels on processed foods because glutinous drops are often found in them. Even many items that are not food related contain gluten. Examples would be vitamins, supplements, cleaners used around the home, and even cosmetics.

It is best to get professional advice from a dietician or nutrition specialist to compile a list of all foods and products that must be avoided.

Gluten is found in the following foods:

  • Cakes, pastries, donuts, cookies
  • Malt vinegar, soy sauce, mustard and mayonnaise
  • Pretzels, potato chips, and snacks of this nature
  • Mixed vegetable oil can contain wheat-germ oil
  • Bread, pasta and breakfast cereals
  • Many candies
  • Many ice creams
  • Some sauces and canned soups

As a celiac sufferer, you should be used to learning how to carefully read food labels and be careful when going food shopping that you read labels from the products on the store shelves is celiac food. Luckily, there are products today which are gluten-free and more than ever before!

Conclusion

So now you know what the link is between celiac disease and diabetes. Celiac disease can be very dangerous if you aren’t aware of gluten. As far as diabetes goes, you only have to be concerned if you have type 1, not type 2. As if have type 1 diabetes isn’t enough, right? Knowledge is power. Take it with you and good luck!

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8 thoughts on “Celiac Disease and Diabetes-What is the Secret Link & Solution?

  1. When I was pregnant with each of my children I suffered gestational diabetes. The one thing I learned was that cinnamon  powder is great for sugar levels. Every morning I would have to get up to monitor my sugar levels as well make sure that my eating was at a great level where there wasn’t too much sugar in it. My sister actually has celiac disease as well as diabetes. She actually got hit by a double whammy, not really fair on her but she has learned how to keep her sugar levels in check. I will forward your article to her as I think this is something she really needs to read as so not to feel alone

    1. Hi Jagi 🙂

      I also have an article here about gestational diabetes. Cinnamon is also great for sugar levels. I take it every day.

      It’s hard to go through that and have celiac disease at the same time as your sister has. Celiac disease and diabetes together are a horrible combination!

      Celiac is all about avoiding gluten. I never even knew this so many years back. Now it’s very well known.

      Thankfully you can’t have celiac disease unless you’re type 1 diabetic. So if you’re type 2, you’re okay.

      I appreciate your feedback. Thank you 🙂

  2. I mean Celiac Disease is the one end of an extreme. But there are many “conditions” in between. In fact, if I’m not mistaken, I read somewhere that about 50% of modern day population suffer from hidden allergies that regard either consumption of gluten or milk products. These also usually arise because of genetics, if I’m not mistaken.

    I want to ask though, is it that diabetes type 1 is always related to genetics? Don’t people more often than not develop it instead of acquire it genetically? Obviously I might be wrong or you might have mentioned it in the article, I might have missed it. I did find the article hard to read in some areas.

    Don’t get me wrong, Rob, I’m not judging you or criticizing you in any way. Just wanted to give you a heads up! 🙂

    All in all I do imagine that people having both of these conditions may feel quite unhappy or maybe even in a way victimized. These certainly aren’t the easiest illnesses to live with. However, I do strongly believe that even if you have them, there is absolutely no reason to be upset, life happens. It’s all about how you react to the stuff that comes up, it’s not about the circumstances.

    On top of that there is plenty to enjoy of foods out there that doesn’t contain neither gluten, nor sugar. I’ve been on that kind of a diet myself lately, so I can speak from experience. 🙂

    Thus, for anyone out there, who is affected by either or both of these diseases – remember this. “Life doesn’t happen to us. Life happens for us.” – Tony Robbins.

    Cheers, Rob, thank you for sharing!

    Have a Great One!

    Matiss

    1. Hey Matiss,

      There probably are many hidden allergies that so many people have. It’s unfortunate.

      Yes type 1 diabetes is genetic. Your body just does not produce any insulin at all and it’s hereditary.

      I’m not sure exactly what you meant about hard to read in some areas? Anyway, it’s all about presenting the facts about celiac disease and diabetes. That’s what I tried to accomplish.

      I agree that it’s difficult to live with both diseases or even one for that matter. But it is how you react to it that’s important.

      Once you know what foods contain gluten, you can and must avoid them. There are many other options so.

      I agree with Tony Robbins! Great quote!

      Thank you for your feedback!

  3. My friend John was recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease and i have been researching different things about the disease to learn and help him out.

    I had no idea that there was a link between diabetes and celiac disease.  Thank you so much for breaking this down and you provided a lot of useful information that really helps.

    I’m going to get him a blood pressure monitor through your link as a nice gift and I’m sure he’ll appreciate it!

    Thank you!

    1. Hey Barry,

      Sorry that your friend has celiac disease. The fact is that you can develop celiac if you are exposed to gluten for at least 50 years. But you most likely can’t get it if you are type 2 diabetes.

      Celiac disease is connected with people who are type 1 diabetics. It’s gluten that’s the enemy here and it can really do a number on your stomach and intestines.

      I appreciate you stopping by and leaving your comments. I hope your friend enjoys the blood pressure monitor because I love mine!

  4. I’m not aware of this disease but the information you’ve put across here sounds pretty much valuable to share with my diabetic Professor. This sounds like a complimentary disease to type 1 diabetes but it leaves me wondering whether there is the possibility for one to suffer from celiac disease without being diabetic?

    1. It’s a disease that has to do with being allergic to gluten.

      The connection between celiac disease and gluten is that you can only get celiac disease if you are a type 1 diabetic which means you are born with it because your body does not produce any insulin.

      But if you do have celiac disease you must avoid gluten totally.

      If you are type 2 diabetic you don’t have to be concerned because you would have to be exposed to gluten for at least 50 years to even possibly develop an allergy.

      Your comments are appreciated. Thank you!

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